The World Of Animal Dentistry

Dr. Sam Smiley of Dublin, Ohio had been practicing dentistry for thirteen years when he received a fateful call from the Columbus Zoo.  Because a 350 pound gorilla was not eating well, Smiley was asked if he’d perform a dental exam to see if it may be the problem. He agreed and this began his career in animal dentistry began.

In this entertaining interview with Dr. Smiley, you will read the answers to questions like what a typical appointment from start to finish is like and also which animal was his favorite patient.  Check out the full article/interview from Mouthing Off, the blog of The American Dental Association, here: A Look Into The World Of Animal Dentistry.

Things You Might Know About Chewing Gum

You know many things about chewing gum.  It can freshen your breath, help ward off sugar cravings, maybe even seal a leaky pipe in a pinch? Geobeats posted this fun YouTube video of interesting facts about chewing gum.

You’ll learn the history of chewing gum, how it is forbidden in some countries, how it can boost your memory, and how much gum is consumed every year.  Did you know that there is even a famous wall in Seattle that is full of gum, or that Oprah is afraid of chewing gum? Check out the video below:

Public Speaking On Anesthetic

If you’ve ever watched Impractical Jokers, you know that one of the jokers must endure a punishment each episode.  In this hysterical clip, Murr, the one being punished, has to teach a cooking class after being given shots of anesthetic in his mouth.  The stuff they give you at the dentist to numb your mouth when you are getting a procedure done.

This is nothing short of hilarious as Murr tries to talk with a numb mouth, spitting on himself and others!  Check it out.

Worldwide Traditions Of Discarding Baby Teeth

discarding baby teethJust as there are traditions around the world which involve the tooth fairy or tooth mouse, there are traditions worldwide for discarding baby teeth as well. Here are some examples of these traditions:

Throwing teeth

The tradition of throwing away the lost teeth is followed in many nations. This is considered as a symbolic way of encouraging the growth of healthy teeth. Here again, different forms of this tradition can be seen in various countries. In Japan, the upper tooth is thrown straight down to the ground and the lower tooth is thrown up in the air. How the children want their new teeth to grow is represented by the trajectory.

The practice of throwing the lost tooth straight towards the sun is followed in Middle Eastern countries such as Palestine, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt. The children request the sun to send them healthy new teeth in place of the lost ones.

In some countries like Ethiopia, Botswana and Dominican Republic, regardless of whether the lost tooth is from the upper or lower jaw, children throw the tooth on the roof top. According to this custom, people believe that a mouse will collect the tooth from the roof top and send the new strong healthy teeth of a rodent.

Making a ring out of the lost tooth or throwing the teeth over or under the house are some of the traditions followed by children in Austria. Children of Nigeria have a special poem too. While throwing the lost tooth over the attic they recite this poem wherein they request the mice not to eat their lost tooth. People here believe that the new tooth will not grow properly if the mice eat the lost ones.

Special locations for lost teeth

In many parts of Europe, parents ask small children to bury the lost tooth under the ground. According to their customs, this practice will help in the growth of new healthy teeth. Children from Ukraine, recite “Take my old tooth and leave me a new one!” while wrapping the lost tooth in a piece of tissue paper and tucking it away in a dark corner away from sunlight.

In Korea, Vietnam and India, people believe that mice have some role in the growth of the lost tooth. If the lost tooth is from the upper side, then it is placed under the floorboards and if it is from the lower side then it is thrown over the roof top. Similar practice is followed in China. Here small children are asked to place the lost upper tooth at the foot of the bed and lower tooth over the roof top.

Make the event exciting by adapting worldwide traditions

Though you might have your own traditions and practices that you grew up with, adding new traditions could indeed be exciting as well as entertaining for your family. The ordinary Tooth Fairy routine could be made more exciting by adding some cultural practices followed in other nations. Let your children know the various customs followed in other nations.

You could even purchase a copy of the children’s book on Spanish Raton Perez and gift it to your child. Sharing stories about customs and traditions followed in other nations will certainly help alleviate the worries of your small child to a considerable extent.

Time for Some Mystery: Tooth Fairy & Tooth Mouse

tooth fairyIt can be exciting or very traumatic for small children when they start losing their baby teeth. Sometimes the tooth is loose enough that it will fall off very easily, but in some cases it could cause some pain and slight bleeding too. To help ease the worries of their small children and to make the event more exciting for them, parents have associated certain traditions and customs with losing teeth. In English speaking countries, the mystical character of the Tooth Fairy is widely known. But in other nations, across the world, people have their own version of tales and traditions associated with this event so that parents can make the event less dreadful for their children.

Note – The customs and traditions vary widely in different countries. If you could share some additional information about the ones followed in your country, you are most welcome.

Mystical Character – The Tooth Fairy

Placing the lost tooth underneath the pillow is a tradition which is followed in countries like Canada, United States and England. According to the fairy tale, the tooth fairies visit the children at night, purchase the tooth for some coins and use the teeth to build all kinds of things in their fairy land.

The British people are very much familiar with this mythological character, The Tooth Fairy. The concept of this bedtime visitor or tooth collecting mythological character has been around for several centuries. It was in the year 1949, Lee Rogow published the story version as “The Tooth Fairy”.  The tooth collecting fairy is very popular among small children in various other countries such as Australia, Norway, Germany, Ireland, America, Demark and Canada.

It is not that that tooth fairy buys the tooth in exchange for money alone. Sometimes children can also expect to find small toys or other gift items.

Mystical Character – Tooth Mouse

In some countries like Mexico, Guatemala and other Spanish speaking cultures, the fairy that collects teeth is actually a mouse.  A fairy mouse to be precise. Raton Perez, the mystical mouse fairy which Mexican people believe in, actually leaves a few coins in exchange for the tooth which the small children leave under their pillow. In Spain, the mystical mouse fairy is called by the name Ratoncito Perez or Raton de los Dientes.

La Petite Souris, or the little mouse is the fairy tale character which small children of France are familiar with. This tooth mouse leaves small toys and gifts in exchange for the tooth. The White Fairy Mouse which the Scottish people believe in leaves coins in exchange for tooth.

The mystical character, the Tooth Mouse, was known to have existed even before the Tooth Fairy. There has been a mention of this mythological character in the 17th century French story book “La Bonne Petite Souris”. This fairy tale is all about a fairy mouse that takes on an evil king and defeats him. According to this Good Little Mouse story, the mouse knocks down the teeth of the evil king while he is sleeping at night time.

As decades passed by, a new version of the sweet, money bearing mouse developed. Here the mouse would creep in at night time and leave a coin in exchange for the tooth placed under the pillow. France, Luxembourg, Belgium, Switzerland, Mexico, Morocco, Argentina, Algeria and Venezuela are some of the nations where tooth mouse is very popular.