New Imaging Method May Allow Dentists To Detect Cavities Earlier

6 Mistakes When Brushing Your Teeth

mistakes when brushingYou know how important it is to brush your teeth. You have most likely heard that poor dental care is linked to heart disease and many other health issues. If you brush your teeth regularly, good for you.  But chances are, you are probably making at least one of these 6 mistakes when brushing your teeth.

You aren’t brushing at the right time of day – Your toothbrush should be the last thing your teeth touch at night.  This is according to Edmond R. Hewlett, DDS. Snacking before bedtime raises your risk of cavities because food can stay lodged between your teeth. Brushing in the morning is just as important.  Bacteria multiples while you sleep, so you need to brush it away.  Brush twice a day for at least 2 minutes.

You use the wrong toothbrush – You should use a soft bristle toothbrush because it can slip under your gum tissue to dislodge plaque. If you don’t remove all the plaque, you are at risk of gum disease. Using a medium or hard bristle brush causes excessive pressure and can cause your gums to recede.

You don’t rinse – Just spitting out your toothpaste after brushing doesn’t remove all the harmful stuff that you got loose while brushing. You should use an alcohol free mouthwash with hydrogen peroxide.

You don’t use the correct technique – Just brushing straight up and down won’t get the job done.  You should position the handle of the brush so the bristles are at a 45 degree angle when touching the gums. Then rotate your wrist in a circular motion to remove the plaque. Turn your brush vertically when you move behind your front teeth and pay special attention to the back of your mouth.

You don’t replace your toothbrush – The ADA recommends buying a new brush every three or four months.  This way the brush is more effective as the bristles aren’t run down.  If you have been sick, you should get a new brush right away.

You ignore the rest of your mouth – Don’t just brush your teeth.  You should brush your tongue as well.  It can trap harmful bacteria and cause trouble for your mouth.

6 Mistakes You Make Every Time You Brush Your Teeth|Prevention

Flossing Health Claims Not Proven

do i need to floss everydayYou’ve probably heard a lot of hype in the news lately about flossing.  Certain claims say that flossing is not as important as once thought. In fact, a leading British dentist said there is only “weak evidence” that flossing prevents gum disease and cavities. He added that “more sophisticated trials” are needed.

An Associated Press research study said that evidence in leading journals was weak and unreliable. If you ask your dentist though, he/she will most likely tell you that flossing is still very important.  Some people may not have large enough spaces between their teeth to use an inter-dental brush so flossing is a good alternative.

Read more about flossing claims and studies in the Salisbury Journal.

 

 

Do I Really Need To Floss Every Day?

 floss every dayYour bedtime routine probably consists of washing your face, brushing your teeth, changing into comfy PJs. But flossing? Flossing is the easy-to-forget habit you know you should be doing daily. But is it really that big of a deal if you don’t floss every day? According to Mark Burhenne, D.D.S, the answer is “No”.

“I would say it’s not a big deal,” says Mark Burhenne, D.D.S., a California dentist and author of The 8-Hour Sleep Paradox​. “It’s really diet and lifestyle first, and then it’s flossing and brushing.”

Check out this video and article from Shape Magazine on the importance of flossing and how your diet can help keep your teeth even healthier than flossing.

Dental Floss: Do I Need To Floss Every Day? | Shape Magazine

Testing Toothpaste and Toothbrushes

toothpaste and toothbrushesEvery morning you wake up and brush your teeth. You use toothpaste and a toothbrush. Have you ever wondered the process that went into getting you that toothpaste and toothbrush?

There are a large selection of dental hygiene products. There are brushes with bristles of varying lengths. Bristles that are rounded, pointed, hard and soft.

There are various forms of toothpaste formulas that have been tested on artificial tooth enamels. In an article from the Dental Tribune, they explain the process of testing toothbrushes and toothpastes. Check it out here: http://www.dental-tribune.com/articles/specialities/dental_hygiene/29162_testing_toothpastes_toothbrushes.html