Worldwide Traditions Of Discarding Baby Teeth

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discarding baby teethJust as there are traditions around the world which involve the tooth fairy or tooth mouse, there are traditions worldwide for discarding baby teeth as well. Here are some examples of these traditions:

Throwing teeth

The tradition of throwing away the lost teeth is followed in many nations. This is considered as a symbolic way of encouraging the growth of healthy teeth. Here again, different forms of this tradition can be seen in various countries. In Japan, the upper tooth is thrown straight down to the ground and the lower tooth is thrown up in the air. How the children want their new teeth to grow is represented by the trajectory.

The practice of throwing the lost tooth straight towards the sun is followed in Middle Eastern countries such as Palestine, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt. The children request the sun to send them healthy new teeth in place of the lost ones.

In some countries like Ethiopia, Botswana and Dominican Republic, regardless of whether the lost tooth is from the upper or lower jaw, children throw the tooth on the roof top. According to this custom, people believe that a mouse will collect the tooth from the roof top and send the new strong healthy teeth of a rodent.

Making a ring out of the lost tooth or throwing the teeth over or under the house are some of the traditions followed by children in Austria. Children of Nigeria have a special poem too. While throwing the lost tooth over the attic they recite this poem wherein they request the mice not to eat their lost tooth. People here believe that the new tooth will not grow properly if the mice eat the lost ones.

Special locations for lost teeth

In many parts of Europe, parents ask small children to bury the lost tooth under the ground. According to their customs, this practice will help in the growth of new healthy teeth. Children from Ukraine, recite “Take my old tooth and leave me a new one!” while wrapping the lost tooth in a piece of tissue paper and tucking it away in a dark corner away from sunlight.

In Korea, Vietnam and India, people believe that mice have some role in the growth of the lost tooth. If the lost tooth is from the upper side, then it is placed under the floorboards and if it is from the lower side then it is thrown over the roof top. Similar practice is followed in China. Here small children are asked to place the lost upper tooth at the foot of the bed and lower tooth over the roof top.

Make the event exciting by adapting worldwide traditions

Though you might have your own traditions and practices that you grew up with, adding new traditions could indeed be exciting as well as entertaining for your family. The ordinary Tooth Fairy routine could be made more exciting by adding some cultural practices followed in other nations. Let your children know the various customs followed in other nations.

You could even purchase a copy of the children’s book on Spanish Raton Perez and gift it to your child. Sharing stories about customs and traditions followed in other nations will certainly help alleviate the worries of your small child to a considerable extent.

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